On not being stingy with God's mercy

God wants everyone, regardless of morality, orthodoxy, lack of preparation, age or culture, to come to the unlimited waters of divine mercy. (Artwork: “Jesus and the Penitent Woman,” stained glass at the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Juneau, Alaska.) — Credit: MIKE NELSON

Today, for a number of reasons, we struggle to be generous and prodigal with God's mercy.

As the number of people who attend church services continues to decline, the temptation among many of our church leaders and ministers is to see this more as a pruning than as a tragedy and to respond by making God's mercy less, rather than more, accessible.

For example, a seminary professor whom I know shares that, after 40 years of teaching a course designed to prepare seminarians to administer the sacrament of penance, today sometimes the first question that the seminarians ask is: "When can I refuse absolution?" In effect, “How scrupulous must I be in dispensing God's mercy?”

To their credit, their motivation is mostly sincere, however misguided. They sincerely fear playing fast and loose with God's grace, fearing that they might end up dispensing cheap grace. 

Partly that's a valid motive. Fear of playing fast and loose with God's grace, coupled with concerns for truth, orthodoxy, proper public form, and fear of scandal have their own legitimacy. Mercy needs always to be tempered by truth.

But sometimes the motives driving our hesitancy are less noble, and our anxiety about handing out cheap grace arises more out of timidity, fear, legalism and our desire, however unconscious, for power.

Yet even when mercy is withheld for the nobler of those reasons, we're still misguided, bad shepherds, out of tune with the God whom Jesus proclaimed. God's mercy, as Jesus revealed it, embraces indiscriminately the bad and the good, the undeserving and the deserving, the uninitiated and the initiated.

One of the truly startling insights that Jesus gave us is that the mercy of God, like the light and warmth of the sun, cannot not go out to everyone. Consequently it's always free, undeserved, unconditional, universal in embrace, and has a reach beyond all religion, custom, rubric, political correctness, mandatory program, ideology and even sin itself.

For our part then, especially those of us who are parents, ministers, teachers, catechists and elders, we must risk proclaiming the prodigal character of God's mercy. We must not spend God's mercy as if it were ours to spend, dole out God's forgiveness as if it were a limited commodity, put conditions on God's love as if God were a petty tyrant or a political ideology, or cut off access to God as if we were the keeper of the heavenly gates.

We aren't. If we tie God's mercy to our own timidity and fear, we limit it to the size of our own minds.

It is interesting to note in the Gospels how the apostles, well-meaning of course, often tried to keep certain people away from Jesus as if they weren't worthy, as if they were an affront to his holiness or would somehow stain his purity. So they perennially tried to prevent children, prostitutes, tax-collectors, known sinners and the uninitiated of all kinds from coming to Jesus.

And always, Jesus overruled their attempts with words to this effect: "Let them come! I want them to come."

Early on in my ministry, I lived in a rectory with a saintly old priest. He was over 80, nearly blind, but widely sought out and respected, especially as a confessor. One night, alone with him, I asked him this question: "If you had your priesthood to live over again, would you do anything differently?"

From a man so full of integrity, I fully expected that there would be no regrets. So his answer surprised me. Yes, he did have a regret, a major one, he said:

"If I had my priesthood to do over again, I would be easier on people the next time. I wouldn't be so stingy with God's mercy, with the sacraments, with forgiveness. I fear I've been too hard on people. They have pain enough without me and the Church laying further burdens on them. I should have risked God's mercy more!"

I was struck by this because, less than a year before, as I took my final exams in the seminary, one of the priests who examined me, gave me this warning: "Be careful," he said, "don't be soft. Only the truth sets people free. Risk truth over mercy."

As I age, I am ever more inclined to the old priest's advice: We need more to risk God's mercy. The place of justice and truth should never be ignored, but we must risk letting the infinite, unbounded, unconditional, undeserved mercy of God flow free.

But, like the apostles, we well-intentioned persons are forever trying to keep certain individuals and groups away from God's mercy as it is offered in word, sacrament, and community. God doesn't want our protection. What God does want is for everyone, regardless of morality, orthodoxy, lack of preparation, age or culture, to come to the unlimited waters of divine mercy.

George Eliot once wrote: "When death, the great reconciler, has come, it is never our tenderness that we repent of, but our severity."

 

Oblate of Mary Immaculate Father Ronald Rolheiser is a specialist in the field of spirituality and systematic theology. His website is www.ronrolheiser.com.


Voices

Statement on U.S. Supreme Court Decision in United States v. Texas

Archbishop José H. Gomez

Our nation’s ongoing failure to address the immigration crisis is a humanitarian tragedy. For more than a decade, state and local governments, Congress, the President, the courts — and now the highest court in the land — all have failed in their responsibilities to address this issue. 

Events

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June 25, 2016

  • Saturday, June 25

    Los Angeles Foster Care and Adoption Information Meeting, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m., Children’s Bureau Foster Care & Adoption, 1910 Magnolia Ave., Los Angeles. Discover if you have the ability and resources to help a child in need. To RSVP or for more information, call (800) 730-3933. To request an information packet, go to: www.all4kids.org/program/foster-care.

     

    His Mercy Endures Forever, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Grand Ballroom, Long Beach Convention Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach. Presented by The Sower Metanoia. Speakers: Fr. R. Tony Richard from New Orleans; Lay evangelist Jesse Romero; Fr. Ismael Robles; Sower prayer ministry leader Sandra Burroughs, Noel Diaz, founder of El Sembrador. Praise & Worship- The Sower Band. Donation $25/person (Buy 3 tix get a 4th free). Info: (877) 714-5679, Spanish (818) 700-4938. Get tickets at www.sowermetanoia.com.

     

    New Rite of Matrimony Workshop by the Archdiocesan Office for Worship, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., St. Junipero Serra, 5205 Upland Rd., Camarillo. Speakers from the Bishops’ Committee on Divine Worship and the Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions (FDLC). Implementation of the new rite begins Sept. 8, 2016, and is mandated as of Dec. 30, 2016. To register, go to: www.fdlc.org.

     

    How Can This Man Give Us His Flesh to Eat?, 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m., St Madeleine parish, 931 East Kingsley Ave., Pomona. The many prophecies, antetypes and allusions to the Holy Eucharist and Holy Mass found in the Torah and in the Gospels--along with adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. A mini-retreat conducted by Tidings columnist Sean M. Wright. Register at the parish. Info: (909) 629-9495. 

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